Science

Trending Science: Cryo-electron microscopy captures life molecules and the Chemistry Nobel Prize
The 2017 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has gone to three scientists for their lasting work in the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) field. The imaging techniques mark a significant breakthrough in atomic structures and biochemistry.
The role sensing pathways play in our innate immune system
When cells are threatened, for example by viral infection, special sensors are activated to kick-start the immune system. Now, new genetic techniques are increasing our knowledge about how this response mechanism actually unfolds.
Ashes-to-ashes but not quite dust-to-dust, as supernovae death reveals link to stars’ birth
It was previously thought that molecules and dust would be completely obliterated by the tremendous explosions of supernovae. Yet, for the first time, scientists have discovered that this is not actually the case.
Rolling back the frontiers: new insights into how genes operate
Advances in the manner in which we can visualise the atomic structures of cells have been recognised in 2017 Nobel prize for chemistry. These increasingly powerful methods shine a light on how we are constructed and now the use of advanced super-resolution microscopy reveals aspects of the interrelation of the genes to the mechanisms which control them.
Increasing our understanding of the impact of compounds produced by certain fish parasites
European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 80 000 people and has an estimated EUR 3 billion annual turnover. But parasites can cause severe disease outbreaks leading to high economic losses in finfish aquaculture.
The role sensing pathways play in our innate immune system
When cells are threatened, for example by viral infection, special sensors are activated to kick-start the immune system. Now, new genetic techniques are increasing our knowledge about how this response mechanism actually unfolds.
Securing encryption data against the threat of future quantum computers
When quantum computers become available, an existing algorithm will challenge current encryption techniques now considered secure. Work being done by an EU-funded project is laying the grounds for a solution.
Quantum physicists bring Schrödinger’s cat to life (and death)
A real cat can’t be both alive and dead at the same time, Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger said. But quantum physics rewrites the rules, a fact now demonstrated by a team of researchers funded by the EU.
New research shows climate change could impact on 351 million Eurpeans by 2100
According to a study recently published in the ‘The Lancet Planetary Health’, global warming could impact about two-thirds of the European population a year, 351 million people, by 2100, resulting in 152 000 deaths annually.
Securing encryption data against the threat of future quantum computers
When quantum computers become available, an existing algorithm will challenge current encryption techniques now considered secure. Work being done by an EU-funded project is laying the grounds for a solution.

Study in Poland